Antitrust Paradox


New: $3,943.01

  • ASIN: 0465003699
Author: Robert H. Bork
Binding: Hardcover
EAN: 9780465003693
EANList:
  • EANListElement= 9780465003693
  • Edition: First Edition
    ISBN: 0465003699
    Label: Basic Books
    Manufacturer: Basic Books
    NumberOfItems: 1
    NumberOfPages: 462
    PackageDimensions:
  • Height= 140
  • Length= 930
  • Weight= 185
  • Width= 600
  • ProductGroup: Book
    ProductTypeName: ABIS_BOOK
    PublicationDate: 1978-04-20
    Publisher: Basic Books
    Studio: Basic Books
    Title: Antitrust Paradox

    Product Description

    This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1885. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... NARRATIVE OF A FRENCH PROTESTANT REFUGEE IN BOSTON. [See above, volume I., page 233; volume II., pages 183-185, 200-204, 2x6, 258, 271, 300.] By the goodness of God, I arrived in this favored land in perfect 1687. health on the seventeenth of last month, after a passage of fiftythree days--counting from the day we left the Downs, sixty miles from London, to the day we reached Boston--and I may say, that few ships make the trip in so short a time. Our voyage was a very happy one, and I may say that with the exception of three days and three nights, during which we experienced a heavy storm, the time passed agreeably and delightfully, every person on board enjoying himself. The women, the young girls and the children gathered on the deck, almost every day, for diversion. We did not have the pleasure of fishing on the Banks, inasmuch as we did not reach them, but sailed fifty leagues to the south of them, our course being almost uniformly from east to west. We reached the latitude of the Fayal islands, [the Azores,] passing within sixty leagues of them. These islands belong to the Portuguese, and lie at the distance of four hundred leagues from England. Were it not for the fear of the corsairs of Salee, [Morocco,] which frequently cruise in the vicinity of these islands, vessels would often visit their harbors; but on account of those pirates they avoid them, keeping to the north. We met while at sea a great many ships, some coming from the fisheries on the Banks, and others coming from the islands of America [the West Indies]. Among the latter, we met a ship of La Rochelle, which was on her way from Martinique with a cargo of sugar, and which had previously made a voyage to Guinea, whence she had brought one hundred and fifty negroes, and two Capuchin fri...